Category: News

ROUND-UP: Engie rapid network; ChargePoint’s record funding; new charging technologies unveiled

Engie to roll out rapid EV charging network in Yorkshire

Engie has been appointed by West Yorkshire Combined Authority to install, operate and supply green electricity to a network of 88 rapid electric vehicle chargers aimed at servicing both residents or the region and taxis and private hire vehicles.

After securing almost £2 million from the government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) for the work, West Yorkshire Combined Authority and its district partners are providing £1.2 million of match funding to fund the roll-out.

Installations of the charge points are set to get underway in 2019 after Engie identifies suitable and convenient locations. Among those to be installed at 30 in and around Leeds, 20 in Bradford and 17 rapid charging points in Kirklees.

Wilfrid Petrie, chief executive of Engie UK and Ireland, said: “Engie is committed to improving the lives of people in cities and urban areas by tackling air pollution and we hope the provision of rapid electric vehicle charge points across the West Yorkshire region will help encourage more people to choose a low emission vehicle.”

They will be free to use until late October 2021, with each charging point to two bays – one specifically for taxis and private hire vehicles and the other for all other users.

Councillor Kim Groves, chair of the West Yorkshire Combined Authority transport committee, said: “Installing new charging points at these 88 sites, where people can charge their vehicles for free, is designed to encourage the transfer to electric vehicles.

“Making half the bays exclusively for the use of taxis and private hire vehicles could result in up to 500 diesel taxis and private hire vehicles being converted to hybrid and pure electric versions by 2020, which would reduce nitrogen dioxide emissions from taxis by as much as 18%, in line with our target of developing clean energy and environmental resilience for Leeds City Region.”

ChargePoint secures biggest funding round in company history

ChargePoint has secured US$240 million (~£187.9 million) in its latest fundraising round to continue the expansion of its electric vehicle network across Europe and the US.

The Series H funding has proved to be the largest in the company’s history from a range of new investors from the energy, pensions, venture capital, oil and gas, utility, manufacturing, technology and automotive sectors.

The likes of Clearvision, Daimler Trucks & Buses and Government of Singapore Investment Corporation (GIC) have joined existing invetsors from BMW i Ventures, Braemar Energy Ventures, Linse Capital, and Siemens.

Pasquale Romano, president and chief executive of ChargePoint, said: “The broader energy and mobility ecosystem has recognised that we are at a tipping point in the generational shift to transportation electrification. Leading investors from automotive, utilities, oil and gas, and financial institutions are coming together to support ChargePoint’s vision of an all-electric future as the mass adoption of electric mobility and the transition to electric fleets accelerate.”

ChargePoint will use the latest funding in part to further expand its network by continuing to build its footprint in Europe and North America. This follows the EV charging giant pledging to deploy 2.5 million EV charging points across the two regions by 2025.

New charging technology for Southwark council

Southwark Council has installed its first electric vehicle chargers with Siemens and ubitricity, which is offering a new kind of combined charger with pay as you go and smart cable functionality.

The council is in talks to install around 60 to help residents in the area charge their vehicles, with the ubitricity SimpleSocketPlus technology able to be used to retrofit the street lights and bollards, eliminating the need for additional infrastructure on the street.

Councillor Richard Livingstone, cabinet member at Southwark Council, said: “These new charge points are making it easier than ever for people who live in Southwark to make the switch to electric vehicles.”

Users can bring their own standard charging cables to plug in and charge via a smartphone, paying a flat rate of 24p/kWh. Alternatively, they can utilise an ubitricity SmartCable to connect and charge from as little as 16.2p/kWh from their own energy tariff.

Chris Beadsworth, director of medium voltage systems at Siemens Energy Management, said: “Siemens as strategic shareholder of ubitricity is working closely with them to provide quality, convenient and open access charging points to help accelerate the increase in privately owned electric vehicles. Our aim is that charging your car should be affordable and as simple as charging your phone.

“By making charging convenient for millions of people in cities, such as London, it will help accelerate the uptake of electric vehicles, driving a cleaner and greener city.”

Alfa Power doubles fastest charging speed in the UK

Alfa Power has unveiled the first 120kW EV charger in Leeds, doubling the previous benchmark for the fastest charger in the UK.

The ‘ultra-fast’ charger Alfa Power’s previous record of 60kW but has been capped at 100kW until the market requires it full charging speed.

It has been installed within the new clean air zone in Leeds, allowing the business to contribute clean fuel options for motorists in the area.

Like the 60kW rapid charger, the 120kW ultra-fast charger offers simultaneous AC and DC charging options. Both can charge up to four vehicles at a time and unlike others, it offers both DC delivery options (CCS and CHAdeMO) to be used simultaneously as well as Rapid AC type 2 delivery at 43kW and an open type 2 socket that is capable of up to 22kW charging.

ROUND-UP: Engie rapid network; ChargePoint’s record funding; new charging technologies unveiled

Engie to roll out rapid EV charging network in Yorkshire

Engie has been appointed by West Yorkshire Combined Authority to install, operate and supply green electricity to a network of 88 rapid electric vehicle chargers aimed at servicing both residents or the region and taxis and private hire vehicles.

After securing almost £2 million from the government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) for the work, West Yorkshire Combined Authority and its district partners are providing £1.2 million of match funding to fund the roll-out.

Installations of the charge points are set to get underway in 2019 after Engie identifies suitable and convenient locations. Among those to be installed at 30 in and around Leeds, 20 in Bradford and 17 rapid charging points in Kirklees.

Wilfrid Petrie, chief executive of Engie UK and Ireland, said: “Engie is committed to improving the lives of people in cities and urban areas by tackling air pollution and we hope the provision of rapid electric vehicle charge points across the West Yorkshire region will help encourage more people to choose a low emission vehicle.”

They will be free to use until late October 2021, with each charging point to two bays – one specifically for taxis and private hire vehicles and the other for all other users.

Councillor Kim Groves, chair of the West Yorkshire Combined Authority transport committee, said: “Installing new charging points at these 88 sites, where people can charge their vehicles for free, is designed to encourage the transfer to electric vehicles.

“Making half the bays exclusively for the use of taxis and private hire vehicles could result in up to 500 diesel taxis and private hire vehicles being converted to hybrid and pure electric versions by 2020, which would reduce nitrogen dioxide emissions from taxis by as much as 18%, in line with our target of developing clean energy and environmental resilience for Leeds City Region.”

ChargePoint secures biggest funding round in company history

ChargePoint has secured US$240 million (~£187.9 million) in its latest fundraising round to continue the expansion of its electric vehicle network across Europe and the US.

The Series H funding has proved to be the largest in the company’s history from a range of new investors from the energy, pensions, venture capital, oil and gas, utility, manufacturing, technology and automotive sectors.

The likes of Clearvision, Daimler Trucks & Buses and Government of Singapore Investment Corporation (GIC) have joined existing invetsors from BMW i Ventures, Braemar Energy Ventures, Linse Capital, and Siemens.

Pasquale Romano, president and chief executive of ChargePoint, said: “The broader energy and mobility ecosystem has recognised that we are at a tipping point in the generational shift to transportation electrification. Leading investors from automotive, utilities, oil and gas, and financial institutions are coming together to support ChargePoint’s vision of an all-electric future as the mass adoption of electric mobility and the transition to electric fleets accelerate.”

ChargePoint will use the latest funding in part to further expand its network by continuing to build its footprint in Europe and North America. This follows the EV charging giant pledging to deploy 2.5 million EV charging points across the two regions by 2025.

New charging technology for Southwark council

Southwark Council has installed its first electric vehicle chargers with Siemens and ubitricity, which is offering a new kind of combined charger with pay as you go and smart cable functionality.

The council is in talks to install around 60 to help residents in the area charge their vehicles, with the ubitricity SimpleSocketPlus technology able to be used to retrofit the street lights and bollards, eliminating the need for additional infrastructure on the street.

Councillor Richard Livingstone, cabinet member at Southwark Council, said: “These new charge points are making it easier than ever for people who live in Southwark to make the switch to electric vehicles.”

Users can bring their own standard charging cables to plug in and charge via a smartphone, paying a flat rate of 24p/kWh. Alternatively, they can utilise an ubitricity SmartCable to connect and charge from as little as 16.2p/kWh from their own energy tariff.

Chris Beadsworth, director of medium voltage systems at Siemens Energy Management, said: “Siemens as strategic shareholder of ubitricity is working closely with them to provide quality, convenient and open access charging points to help accelerate the increase in privately owned electric vehicles. Our aim is that charging your car should be affordable and as simple as charging your phone.

“By making charging convenient for millions of people in cities, such as London, it will help accelerate the uptake of electric vehicles, driving a cleaner and greener city.”

Alfa Power doubles fastest charging speed in the UK

Alfa Power has unveiled the first 120kW EV charger in Leeds, doubling the previous benchmark for the fastest charger in the UK.

The ‘ultra-fast’ charger Alfa Power’s previous record of 60kW but has been capped at 100kW until the market requires it full charging speed.

It has been installed within the new clean air zone in Leeds, allowing the business to contribute clean fuel options for motorists in the area.

Like the 60kW rapid charger, the 120kW ultra-fast charger offers simultaneous AC and DC charging options. Both can charge up to four vehicles at a time and unlike others, it offers both DC delivery options (CCS and CHAdeMO) to be used simultaneously as well as Rapid AC type 2 delivery at 43kW and an open type 2 socket that is capable of up to 22kW charging.

Utilities, automakers and big oil: the future of EV charging says EY

Utilities, automakers and big oil companies will drive the deployment of electric vehicle charging infrastructure, according to a new report by EY, which warns that despite market uncertainty, investment needs to be made or “it’s highly likely they’ll be late to the party”.

‘Driving the electric vehicle revolution’, released as part of the consultancy’s Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) publication, suggests that the key investors in the future of e-mobility have already been determined.

However, they face considerable uncertainty over how quickly EVs will displace traditional vehicles, and how what forms of charging will actually be required. Investment now could see heavy losses from low utilisation, or lead to stranded assets if the wrong charging infrastructure is deployed.

Much has been made of the split between home, workplace and destination, and public charging networks, with many in the UK sector expecting public charging to be the least utilisation option.

However, those deploying such infrastructure have suggested that this will be needed to solve the issue of range anxiety for drivers concerned their EVs won’t make the distances required, while also being used to meet current driving behaviour which sees people ‘fill up’ at petrol station-like EV charging hubs.

According to Michael Cahill, management consultant at EY, the danger to any investors in this space will be in not acting soon enough to capture a portion of the market.

“If they don’t invest now, it’s highly likely they’ll be late to the party. But, equally, players might not want to risk investing too early and narrowly in a market where technology and policy is constantly developing,” he said.

A number of those able to do so have already made such moves across the utility, automotive OEMs and oil and gas sectors as competition has already begun to take hold.

For the former, EY says the opportunity lies in making use of a new source of demand to which utilities can sell electricity while also increasing their business interactions with customers. In the UK, this has been evidenced most recently by the launch of an end-to-end EV package by ScottishPower, which has partnered with a car dealership to offer drivers an EV of their choice with an installation of a home charger, powered with green electricity.

Similarly Sweden’s Vattenfall has its own InCharge offer, E.On recently launched its own charging business and tariff and EDF Group recently took aim at the competition with a pledge to become Europe’s leading e-mobility energy company within four years.

While this could pose issues for some of the utilities, particularly those like Vattenfall which operate networks, integrating charging intelligently is likely to offer a positive asset to their business by providing some stability control as renewables penetration grows in countries around the world.

Vehicle-to-grid will offer such an opportunity with, EDF Energy recently announcing an upcoming launch of a V2G offer with Nuvve.

Automakers are also using this technology as a way into the market, with Carl Bayliss, head of EV and energy services business development at Nissan – the automaker involved in two V2G innovation projects in the UK – saying this week: “We will very quickly find that the proof of concept and the business models that we are looking to validate will be very easy to bring to market.”

The likes of Nissan, and other ‘transport sector incumbents’ as EY calls them, will also be able need to take action of EV charging infrastructure to ensure their vehicles are well served once on the road. A number have already made this move, with Tesla establishing its own rapid network dedicated to its customers.

Similarly, IONITY – a joint venture launched by BMW Group, Daimler, the Ford Motor Company and the Volkswagen Group – is rolling out 400 high speed chargers across Europe to guarantee that the EV models to be launched in the coming years have charging infrastructure already in place.

This is also why the 350kW chargers from Tritium being installed despite no current vehicles on the market being able to take full advantage of the charging speed.

This is being done alongside oil companies, identified by EY as the final main group able to invest in this emerging sector, with Shell to receive IONITY chargers at 80 of its locations. Many of these companies have already begun to flex their buying power, such as BP which this year bought UK charging network operator Chargemaster for £130 million.

In addition to its work with IONITY, Shell purchased Dutch-based charging provider NewMotion, while Total recently bought French firm G2mobility and partnered with ChargePoint to offer its business customers in the UK EV charging solutions.

Despite these early moves across the charging sector, EY have warned that risk mitigation will be required to ensure the right decisions are made at this early stage, alongside a full understanding of the sector.

Samuel Pachoud, advisory senior manager at EY, said: “Fundamentally, investors in the space need to understand the full ecosystem – electric vehicles, charging infrastructure, grid services, energy storage and connected services – before identifying commercially viable business models and injecting investment at scale. Convergence at customer, technology and infrastructure levels will provide the opportunity.”

Fastned targets UK EV charging market following €11 million fund raise

Dutch fast electric vehicle charging provider Fastned has set its sights on the UK as one of four markets to be targeted following an €11 million (~£9.6 million) fund raising.

The company issued bonds last month offering 6% interest per annum over five years to be paid quarterly in arrears. The proceeds are now to be used to expand Fastned’s network beyond the Netherlands and Germany, where it currently has 78 operational stations, to include Belgium and the UK.

The company has 12 fast charging stations under construction and expects to use the latest funding boost to expand this further.

Bart Lubbers, co-founder of Fastned, said: “More than 5,000 people have now invested in Fastned. These people believe in our mission and in our company. They see that the growth of electric mobility is accelerating.

“Where our stations used to get only a few visitors per day, we now see multiple cars charging at the same time. Our best station already attracts more than 100 visitors a day! This is just the beginning and people are seeing that.”

The company says it has grown around 10% month-on-month in recent years, with its operational network breaking even in September. It recently unveiled its new generation of 350kW fast charging stations as a result of its partnership with technology provider ABB, with the first installed on a highway near Amsterdam.

FastNed has a foothold in the UK owing to a contract with Newcastle University, where it will install what could be the UK’s first public 175kW electric vehicle chargers.

Southwark Council begins roll out of lamppost electric vehicle charging

Southwark Council is launching a network of 50 lamppost electric vehicle charge points after partnering with char.gy to deliver installations in two areas of the borough.

Two chargers are already live, with plans to roll out the rest of the network across Borough & Bankside and Dulwich by the end of January.

Char.gy designs and manufactures the units, which are rated at 7.7kW charging speed. However, due to the availability of power from the lampposts, these are reduced to around 5.3kW in most instances.

Lamp post charging has become an area of interest for local authorities, particularly those in London, as they offer a solution to residents without off street parking without adding to existing street furniture.

In addition, char.gy can offer load management across multiple chargers, queuing or delaying charging periods or reducing speeds at times of grid constraint.

Richard Stobart, chief executive of char.gy, said: “Char.gy offers easy, affordable, open-access EV charging without the need to dig-up residential streets across Southwark to lay additional cables or add on-street electricity cabinets. We look forward to offering this convenient means of on-street charging as a vital step towards reducing vehicle emissions across London.”

Residents are able to use a standard (Type 2) charging cable into the char.gy unit and enter the location of the unit into their device’s browser to begin charging, or via charge point’s dedicated URL.

The browser application tariffs, payments and offers locations for the nearest char.gy points. In addition to this open access, EV drivers are also able to choose a membership offering ‘pay-as-you-go’ or tariff packages.

Councillor Richard Livingstone, cabinet member for environment, transport management and air quality at Southwark Council, said: “These new charge points are making it easier than ever for people who live in Southwark to make the switch to electric vehicles.”

EDF Energy prepares launch of V2G offer following agreement with Nuvve

EDF Energy is to offer its business customers vehicle-to-grid (V2G) chargers, as well as using them on its own sites, after partnering with charger supplier and technology developer Nuvve.

The supplier is expecting the partnership to result in up to 1,500 installations of V2G chargers, while hoping to unlock 15MW of additional energy storage capacity at its own sites.

This represents the largest planned deployment of V2G technology in the UK, overtaking Nissan and OVO Energy’s plans to install 1,000 chargers under a government-backed innovation project.

Using the V2G chargers, idle EVs are able to be used to participate in the energy services markets at times, or be used to power onsite demand.

EDF Energy expects its business customers to utilise their fleet or workforce vehicles to tap into these revenues and energy savings using its new offer, taking advantage of the expected increase in EVs entering the commercial sector.

The government has pledged that by 2030, at least 50% of new cars and 40% of new vans sold in the UK will be electric, and with more than a million bought by businesses each view, the supplier hopes the new partnership will tap into growing demand for EV charging technologies and grid flexibility.

This view is supported by a recent report from Aurora which found the demand for electric vehicle chargers across workplaces, as well as shops and motorways, could offer a £6 billion opportunity by to 2040.

Beatrice Bigois, managing director of customers at EDF Energy, said: “With 55% of new vehicles coming on to the road through businesses, they will play a key role in the transition to electric transport.

“Through this partnership with Nuvve, we are investing in smart technologies that will help our business customers electrify their fleets in a cost effective way and support the UK’s ambition for clean growth.”

In addition, Nuvve’s co-founder and chief executive Gregory Poilasne said its technology offered “the perfect way” to supplement the UK’s efforts to integrate renewables into the grid, as well as across Europe as part of the strategic partnership agreed with EDF Group.

The new partnership comes just days after Total Gas & Power announced a partnership with ChargePoint to offer EV charging points to its business customers, which account for 175,000 across the UK.

While this sector is rapidly drawing the attention of such firms, the latest from EDF is part of its ambitious plans set out this month to dominate the European e-mobility by 2022.

The boost to UK deployment of V2G chargers in particular, currently led by the efforts of a selection of projects awarded government funding back in January, resulting from the EDF and Nuvve agreement has been met with approval by energy and clean growth minister Claire Perry.

“These 1,500 electric chargers will provide much needed green infrastructure for businesses as they seize the opportunities of the electric vehicle revolution, reducing running costs, improving air quality and unlocking the capability to store energy which can be transmitted back into the grid when it’s needed most,” she said.

Total business customers to be offered EV charging solutions under ChargePoint partnership

Total Gas & Power is to launch a new electric vehicle charging offer to the 175,000 business sites it supplies throughout the UK after agreeing a reseller partnership with ChargePoint.

Customers of the oil and gas giant’s UK business supplier arm will be able to enter into new agreements for the installation of charge points supplied by ChargePoint which will carry out the work via a nationwide delivery partner.

Chargers ranging from 22kW up to 500kW speeds will be available depending on the customers’ needs, along with full ownership or rental agreements to be made with Total Gas & Power, which could tie the installs into a customer’s overall electricity supply deal.

The charge points will be delivered on an ad hoc basis, rather than the model pursued by ChargePoint and Instavolt which as first saw the latter make significant bulk orders to drive its deployment of 50kW chargers.

Sean Guerin, business engagement manager for Total Gas & Power, told Current±: “Somebody makes an enquiry, we ask them some standard questions to form an opinion on what they might require. At the same time there’s also the offer of a site visit…and then it’s a case of liaising with the customer to get something installed. It’s very much about whatever the customer needs.”

He added that ChargePoint had been selected owing to the connected nature of its technology, and follows growing demand from a number of the company’s existing business clients.

Sion Roberts, general manager for Total Gas & Power, said “Recognising that the energy requirements of businesses have progressed well beyond the simple supply of gas and electricity, we are delighted to partner with ChargePoint.

“The relationship means our customers will have access to industry-leading EV charging technology that helps them meet the changing dynamics of vehicle fuelling both for their staff and customers alike.”

The partnership also falls in line with the wider group’s ambitions to transition its business model away from purely oil and gas, as Guerin explained.

“There’s a group wide commitment from the very top of the company in France to be a responsible energy major and take on all of what that entails. Our interpretation was in helping customers meet their environmental needs as they move forward,” he said.

It also follows sweeping policy across the UK to promote the uptake of EVs and deployment of charge points and proposed bans across Europe on the sale of petrol and diesel vehicles in the coming decades.

It is thought that such measures will lead to growing opportunities in the e-mobility space, particularly in the commercial and industrial sector where Aurora Energy Research recently claimed would offer a £6 billion opportunity to 2040.

Commenting on the deal, Mark Kerstens, vice president for strategic accounts at ChargePoint, said: “The transportation landscape is evolving at a rapid pace and partnerships like this are essential to provide immediate, widely accessible charging solutions to support the ever-growing number of EV drivers on the road.

“We look forward to working with Total Gas & Power to provide businesses across the UK with the opportunity to help us lay the groundwork for the next generation of fuelling.”

The new partnership is the latest foray into e-mobility for Total, which last month completed the acquisition of the French firm G2mobility. Meanwhile, it will serve to bolster ChargePoint’s efforts to deploy 2.5 million EV charging points by 2025.

EO Charging secures £13 million investment to roll out ‘charging as a service’

EO Charging, which briefly held the record for the biggest single site installation of electric vehicle chargers earlier this year, has secured £13 million of new investment from Zouk Capital to continue its growth.

Founded in 2015, the company has manufactured over 5,000 charging stations used across homes, fleets and destinations. It now works with the likes of Uber, Addison Lee, Google, and Hampshire Police, and completed the installation of 41 smart-connected chargers at one of Gnewt Cargo’s London depots back in March.

The business currently sells its products in 25 countries around the world and is expecting to grow rapidly over the next three years in-line with the mass adoption of electric vehicles.

Charlie Jardine, founder and chief executive of EO Charging, said: “We’re currently witnessing a revolution in the automotive industry, one that’s akin to when the combustion engine took over from the horse and cart. EV chargers are more than ‘just a plug’; they’re the gateway to the future of mobility and the first piece of the puzzle in giving people energy autonomy.

“We’re a small company with big ambitions and want to become the number one electric vehicle charging manufacturer, for homes, workplaces and fleets, globally by 2025. This investment will catapult EO into an exciting phase of growth and help us shake-up the rapidly growing EV charging industry.”

The new investment from Zouk, which also invests in fast-charging firm Instavolt, will initially be used to grow EO Charging’s team from 20 currently to around 30 by the end of the year, as well as further develop its product range.

The remaining funds will be used to roll out a new ‘charging as a service’ model which, similar to Instavolt’s model, will see the company offer to install units free of charge. Host businesses will then decide for themselves how much to charge for use of the charge points, with EO Charging taking a portion of that revenue over the course of the contract length.

This could boost interest in its fleet solution EO Genuis, which connects smart enabled chargers to the EO Hub which can be managed directly by the host business and communicate with the wider energy system.

This was used by Gnewt Cargo in its Low Emission Freight Trial, which installed a total of 63 chargers across two locations in a project backed by Innovate UK, Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV), the Mayor of London and Transport for London.

EO is also part of the ‘V2GO’ consortium of eight organisations – including EDF Energy, Oxford University, and Upside Energy – to develop and trial vehicle-to-grid charging on a fleet scale and demonstrate any resulting value.

Colin Campbell, partner at Zouk Capital, commented: “We consider EO Charging to be the most exciting young company in the AC charging space with a unique range of high quality yet competitively priced solutions, software and hardware for commercial and private buyers.

“We have tracked EO for over a year and we believe that Zouk will help unlock the huge opportunity ahead for the company operating in an important part of the EV charging market.”

Transport is biggest challenge to Scottish decarbonisation, says climate watchdog

The decarbonisation of transport offers Scotland its biggest challenge in meeting its emissions reduction targets, despite outperforming the rest of the UK overall, according to the country’s climate change watchdog.

According to the Committee on Climate Change’s (CCC) 2018 Progress Report to the Scottish Parliament, overall Scottish emissions were at 49% below 1990 levels in 2016. This puts the region on track to hit its next interim emissions reduction target of at least a 56% in actual emissions by 2020.

In the previous five years, this progress has been led by decarbonisation of the power sector and reductions in emissions from waste in Scotland. Over half (54%) of gross electricity consumption was met by renewables, with an estimate of 68% in 2017, putting the 100% target by 2020 in reach.

Total energy consumption was at just 17.8% from renewables in 2016 which, while above both the UK as a whole and the European Union average (16.7%), would require significant action if the interim target of 30% is to be reached by 2020 which was nonetheless deemed possible.

However, the CCC has said that progress in these areas “masks a lack of progress in other areas” and claimed that there were “no significant reductions” in most in most sectors outside electricity generation and waste.

“Transport is now Scotland’s biggest sectoral challenge” the report states, with the Scottish government’s ambition not yet backed up by its actions particularly on road transport.

The future decarbonisation of Scotland’s roads is very much led by the target it set in September 2017 to phase out diesel and petrol cars by 2032, eight years ahead of the Westminster target.

ChargePlace Scotland, the national network of electric vehicle charge points developed by the Scottish Government through grant funding of local authorities and other organisations, stands at 964 locations according to its website. However, the RAC Foundation figure used by the CCC put it at 1,100 strong with a total of 2,100 connectors.

The report states that the number of public charging points increased by 41% in 2017 at a time when electric vehicle sales in Scotland were below that of the rest of the UK. However, while just 1.2% of car sales were EVs in Scotland last year, total EV sales increased by 67% compared to 24% in Endland, suggesting that demand for EV charging in Scotland is likely to take off at pace.

In the face of more stringent targets in the future around decarbonisation out to 2050, and the electrification of transport, the CCC has said more policy is needed to ensure Scotland is ready. To this end, it has called for a clear plan describing where and when public charging infrastructure will be introduced to ensure it meets demand in 2032.

Lord Deben, chairman of the CCC, said: “Scotland continues to lead the UK in reducing its emissions and has ambitious targets which aim to go further.

“However, challenges remain. Achieving a 90% cut in emissions by 2050, as envisaged within the new Climate Change Bill, means greater effort is now required across other areas of Scotland’s economy. This includes policies to drive down emissions in sectors where they are either flat or rising, such as transport, agriculture and energy efficiency in buildings.”

“Without real action in these areas, Scotland may fall short of its long-term goals.”

To date, the Scottish government has pledged to invest in the ChargePlace network until at least August 2019, and £15 million was recently allocated to fund 1,500 new charge points in homes, businesses and communities, including 150 new public charge points.

Further loan funding for electric vehicles is to be available until 2020, while the Energy Strategy commits to additional policy measures including expanding electric charging infrastructure up to 2022

The establishment of 20 ‘electric towns’ across Scotland by 2025 was also announced under a new Switched on Towns and Cities Challenge Fund, aiming to facilitate greater uptake of plug-in EVs by supporting high capital cost projects, awarding between £1.5 million to £2.5 million per project.

The locations or roll-out strategies of these pledges has yet to be revealed.

Transport is biggest challenge to Scottish decarbonisation, says climate watchdog

The decarbonisation of transport offers Scotland its biggest challenge in meeting its emissions reduction targets, despite outperforming the rest of the UK overall, according to the country’s climate change watchdog.

According to the Committee on Climate Change’s (CCC) 2018 Progress Report to the Scottish Parliament, overall Scottish emissions were at 49% below 1990 levels in 2016. This puts the region on track to hit its next interim emissions reduction target of at least a 56% in actual emissions by 2020.

In the previous five years, this progress has been led by decarbonisation of the power sector and reductions in emissions from waste in Scotland. Over half (54%) of gross electricity consumption was met by renewables, with an estimate of 68% in 2017, putting the 100% target by 2020 in reach.

Total energy consumption was at just 17.8% from renewables in 2016 which, while above both the UK as a whole and the European Union average (16.7%), would require significant action if the interim target of 30% is to be reached by 2020 which was nonetheless deemed possible.

However, the CCC has said that progress in these areas “masks a lack of progress in other areas” and claimed that there were “no significant reductions” in most in most sectors outside electricity generation and waste.

“Transport is now Scotland’s biggest sectoral challenge” the report states, with the Scottish government’s ambition not yet backed up by its actions particularly on road transport.

The future decarbonisation of Scotland’s roads is very much led by the target it set in September 2017 to phase out diesel and petrol cars by 2032, eight years ahead of the Westminster target.

ChargePlace Scotland, the national network of electric vehicle charge points developed by the Scottish Government through grant funding of local authorities and other organisations, stands at 964 locations according to its website. However, the RAC Foundation figure used by the CCC put it at 1,100 strong with a total of 2,100 connectors.

The report states that the number of public charging points increased by 41% in 2017 at a time when electric vehicle sales in Scotland were below that of the rest of the UK. However, while just 1.2% of car sales were EVs in Scotland last year, total EV sales increased by 67% compared to 24% in Endland, suggesting that demand for EV charging in Scotland is likely to take off at pace.

In the face of more stringent targets in the future around decarbonisation out to 2050, and the electrification of transport, the CCC has said more policy is needed to ensure Scotland is ready. To this end, it has called for a clear plan describing where and when public charging infrastructure will be introduced to ensure it meets demand in 2032.

Lord Deben, chairman of the CCC, said: “Scotland continues to lead the UK in reducing its emissions and has ambitious targets which aim to go further.

“However, challenges remain. Achieving a 90% cut in emissions by 2050, as envisaged within the new Climate Change Bill, means greater effort is now required across other areas of Scotland’s economy. This includes policies to drive down emissions in sectors where they are either flat or rising, such as transport, agriculture and energy efficiency in buildings.”

“Without real action in these areas, Scotland may fall short of its long-term goals.”

To date, the Scottish government has pledged to invest in the ChargePlace network until at least August 2019, and £15 million was recently allocated to fund 1,500 new charge points in homes, businesses and communities, including 150 new public charge points.

Further loan funding for electric vehicles is to be available until 2020, while the Energy Strategy commits to additional policy measures including expanding electric charging infrastructure up to 2022

The establishment of 20 ‘electric towns’ across Scotland by 2025 was also announced under a new Switched on Towns and Cities Challenge Fund, aiming to facilitate greater uptake of plug-in EVs by supporting high capital cost projects, awarding between £1.5 million to £2.5 million per project.

The locations or roll-out strategies of these pledges has yet to be revealed.

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